Arrays for Year 4

Year 4 students at Barwon Heads PS were looking at arrays for use in multiplication...

Arrays All Around

Hello Year 4,

After reading your post, I wondered what arrays I could find amongst my photo collection. Here are some I found...

Windows on an old prison at Port Arthur, Tasmania.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

4 rows of 8 windows

4 x 8 = ?

Artwork on a class wall

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

3 rows of 3 artworks

3 x 3 = ?

Pattern on a sofa

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

4 rows of 6 square patterns

4 x 6 = ?

Artwork on a class wall

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

4 rows of 7 artworks

4 x 7 = ?

Windows on Buckingham Palace

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

2 rows of 6 windows

2 x 6 = ?

Panels in a stained glass window

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

5 rows of 3 square stained glass panels

5 x 3 = ?

Tubes in an old steam boiler

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

 5 rows of 6 steam boiler tubes

5 x 6 = ?

6 thoughts on “Arrays for Year 4

  1. Daisy

    Dear Ross,
    I am one of Miss Jordan’s students, Daisy. I appreciate that you have put a comment on just for us!

    I find that arrays help you with things like multiplication and division, ( since they are opposites ). How do you find arrays helpful in everyday life?

    I find them helpful because eg. If you had lots of books you may be able to make an array of them.

    Thanks
    Daisy

    Reply
    1. rossmannell

      Post author

      Hello Daisy,

      I agree, arrays can help us with multiplication and division. I have always been pretty good with mathematics so I don’t need to use them for calculation of smaller numbers. They can help when we have very large numbers to count. I would use them to estimate a total. As an example, if I looked at a crowd sitting in rows of chairs I might notice there are about 500 rows each with about 60 seats (columns). I would then be able to estimate the crowd at…
      500 x 60 = 30,000

      I like arrays because of the patterns in them. Some of my photos in my photo library were taken just because I liked the patterns, whether arrays or random, or colours.

      Reply
  2. Sienna

    Hi Ross,
    Thank you for puting up this post, it must have took you a long time to write it.
    All your arrays are great,I think the last one us very clever.
    ANSWERS TO AREAYS:
    * 4×8=32
    *3×3=9
    *4×7=28
    *2×6=12
    5×3=15
    5×6=30
    To is great to have arrays!
    I find arrays in draws shops bookshelfs in the library and way more.
    What else do you find arrays.
    Sienna

    Reply
    1. rossmannell

      Post author

      Hello Sienna,

      The post itself didn’t take long but I went through thousands of photos in my photo library to find good array examples. I was hoping to find an example of arrays in nature but don’t have any. Nature probably has examples so I will keep a camera ready if I ever find one. Humans work differently to nature so there are many examples if we keep our eyes open.

      Your answers to the arrays are correct. The last array was only photographed last week when I visited Old Mogo Town Pioneer Village in New South Wales. The village is a reconstruction of Mogo’s gold mining past and welcomes visitors and school groups but, at around 900 kilometres from your school, it would be a little too far for a school visit. At a little over 100km, Ballarat’s Sovereign Hill is much better but I haven’t been there for 30 years.

      Reply
  3. Kennedy

    Hi Ross,
    I am a student from barwon heads ps. Thank you for leaving a comment o 4b’s blog. Also thanks for making a post about arrays for us. We all really appreciated it!

    Yours truly,
    Kennedy😉
    (P.S I am in Miss Jordan’s class!)

    Reply
    1. rossmannell

      Post author

      Hello Kennedy,

      Thank you for the comment. Blogging is my way of keeping in touch with classes now that I am retired from teaching. One of the most important things I have learnt is our learning journey never ends providing we keep our minds and eyes open to a world of possibilities. 🙂

      Reply

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