Australia’s Extinct and Endangered Species – for Katey of Techie Kids

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Katey was wondering about extinct species in Australia. I have gathered some references for extinct and endangered animal species in Australia...

 

The First reference is of extinct species as listed on Wikipedia...

List of Extinct Animals of Australia

One of our wonderful Australian magazines, Australian Geographic, has featured extinct and endangered animals. I have been collecting this magazine from it's first issue. Here is a link to their listing of endangered animals...

Latest Endangered Species

 

Looking at Some Animals

Being extinct or endangered, I don't have photos of most mentioned species but I can share some information on related species.

Northern Hairy-Nosed Wombat

There are three known species of wombat to be found in Australiia. They are...

Of these wombats, the northern hairy-nosed wombat is listed as critically endangered. There is a protected colony in the state of Queensland where some births have taken place.

I don't have any photos or videos of my  own of the northern or southern hairy-nosed wombats but I do have photos and videos of the common (or smooth-nosed) wombat. Below is a photo of a wombat joey (baby) named Bert. He was orphaned and has been raised in an animal sanctuary known as Potoroo Palace. Potoroo Palace is run by volunteers. They care for injured and sick animals with the hope of returning them to the wild. Donations and entry fees from visitors help fund the animal sanctuary.  This photo and video clip was taken at a visitors' encounter with Bert.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Potoroo Palace, N.S.W., Australia

I uploaded this video clip so you can see this cute little guy.

Schools and students have permission to use this video clip for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Potoroo Palace, N.S.W., Australia

For the general Wikipedia information about wombats...

WOMBATS

Long-Beaked Echidna

The only monotreme (egg laying) mammals we know still to exist in our world are the platypus and echidna. The platypus is only found in Australia but echidna are found in Australia and New Guinea. Australia is home to the short-beaked echidna and New Guinea to the long-beaked echidna. Long-beaked echidna were thought to be extinct in Australia but there is a chance they might still exist. If they are found, they would also be seen as critically endangered. To read about the possible rediscovery of the long-beaked echidna in Australia...

Extinct echidna may be alive and well in Western Australia

The photo and video clip below are of the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus). I have found one wandering in my yard but the below was taken in Potoroo Palace. This is another video clip prepared for you.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Potoroo Palace, N.S.W., Australia

Schools and students have permission to use this video clip for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Potoroo Palace, N.S.W., Australia

 Tasmanian Devil

The Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) are now only found in the wild in Tasmania. The devil has become endangered in the wild due to a facial cancer first identified in 1996. It's thought 85% of wild devils may have died. There are breeding attempts in zoos and sanctuaries. Below is a link to an article on the Tasmanian devil.

Genetic diversity gives hope to Tassie devils

I don't seem to have a photo of a devil in my collection but I prepared the below drawing for another student and thought I would also share it with you.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Here is a link to the Tasmanian devil post I wrote for Christian...

Tasmanian Devil

Some Animals from the Past

When we go back in time, we can find many animal species have become extinct. You have heard of dinosaurs and perhaps the dodo bird and passenger pigeon. Australia has a number of creatures from the past. Let's see what you think of a few extinct species from Australia's past. I will given you links for more information if you are interested...

Diprotodon optatum - This large marsupial looked something like a large bear but, like all marsupials, the females carried young in their pouch. They could grow to nearly 4m (11ft) long from head to toe. They existed when the first Aborigines came to Australia but habitat change brought them to an end. Fossils have been found.

Dromornis stirtoni - What would you think if you saw a 500kg (1100lb) flightless bird about 3m (9ft) tall? Some scientists believe this bird might have been a meat eater.

Muttaburrasaurus langdoni - The muttaburrasaurus was a large plant eating dinosaur.

 

7 thoughts on “Australia’s Extinct and Endangered Species – for Katey of Techie Kids

  1. Katey

    Dear Mr. Mannell,

    Thank you so much for the post! All the animals are so cute! I really like the videos. The wombat was my favorite one. It is really sad to see all of these animals becoming extinct or endangered. The Tasmanian Devil is really cool. I saw it before when you sent it to Chrisian. He really liked it. Did you draw that yourself?

    Today we received the package you sent in the mail. All of it was so cool! I really liked the post card with the kangaroos on it. 🙂 It looked like one was relaxing, which I thought was kind of funny. I also got to see the picture of the Tasmanian Devil! The little statue of the animal was interesting, too. 🙂 Thank you so much. My class really loved it!

    Oh yeah and one more thing what do you mean when you said the devil has become endangered due to facial cancer? What do you mean by facial cancer?

    Thanks again!

    From,
    Katey
    Techie Kids

    Reply
    1. rossmannell

      Post author

      Hello Katey,

      It is sad we have lost so many species and may lose.

      Yes, I had drawn the Tasmanian devil. While I remember taking photos of devils, I wasn’t able to locate any at this time so I decided to draw one. Drawing has been a hobby of mine. In my latest Extended Comment, you will find some of my other animal drawings. I add them when I don’t have photos of my own and because I want students to be able to use them in class if they wish. Here is the link…
      Australian Animals

      I was surprised how quickly the package had arrived because some I have sent out can take much longer. I had decided to send a gift to the 100th Extended Comment class but also gifts for the 99th and 101st classes. Because you school has such active bloggers, you were the 101st, Mrs. Yollis and her class were the 100th and a class in England was the 99th. I wonder who will be the 200th? 🙂 The 200th probably won’t appear until later this year or early next year.

      In recent years, an infection has been found in wild Tasmanian devils. The disease causes a cancer to develop on the faces of the devils. Sad to say, the cancer is usually fatal if untreated. It’s spread by bites. Because devils can be agressive towards each other, the infection has spread. There are people working on saving the devils by trying to find a cure. Others are keeping infection-free colonies in isolation in the wild. It is sad and I don’t think anyone knows what started the infection but there are many devils in zoos and animal sanctuaries. We can only hope there will be a cure. Maybe, as we have for humans they will find a vaccine.

      @RossMannell

      Reply
      1. Katey

        Dear Mr. Mannell,

        The drawing of the devil is amazing! I wish I could draw like that. I am not that good of a drawer. I looked at the others that you drew, and they are very good! I really liked the humpback whale. 🙂

        When did you send the package? Do you know how many days it took? I wonder who will be the 200th, too! Maybe it will be the Techie Kids! haha! 🙂

        Since the devils are so dangerous, how would people be able to treat them? Wouldn’t the devil give them the disease? I hope they do find a cure for the Tasmanian devil. I think it is sad and unfair for animals to have to suffer like that.

        Thank you for taking your time to reply to me! 🙂

        From,
        Katey
        Techie Kids

        P.S.
        Oh yeah if you go on the Techie Kids page you will see pictures of the items you sent us and a group photo!

        Reply

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