Some More Aussie Animals for Alexis & Techie Kids

To see the Techie Kids blog…    Visit Techie Kids

Hello Again Alexis,

I have sorted through more photos. I don't think I have shared many of these before. Here they are, starting with...

Invertebrates

1. Blue-bottle Jelly fish ( or Portuguese Man-of-war)

These jelly fish are found along our coast. The air sac keeps them on the surface as they drift along. Long tentacles drag behind them trapping small fish. Beaches can close when they are blown towards land. If a tentacle contacts you skin, it can be very painful and can leave a red mark where the tentacle touches. They are sometimes blown onto beaches like this one. As the tentacles can still sting when the blue-bottle is on the beach you still need to take care. This one's air sac would have been about 2 inches (5cm) long and its tentacles two to three feet long.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Bournda National Park, N.S.W., Australia

2. Sand spider

On the same beach walk I photographed the blue-bottle, I photographed this spider. It's a good example of camouflage. Had I not seen it moving, I might have missed seeing this small spider.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Bournda National Park, N.S.W., Australia

3. Yellow-Striped Hunter Dragonfly

It took a few attempts to take this photo. Dragonflies can move quickly but it finally settled long enough.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Bournda National Park, N.S.W., Australia

4. Some Butterflies and Moths

Two butterflies I haven't been able to identify. I must buy a butterfly identification book. 🙂

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Bournda National Park, N.S.W., Australia

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Bournda National Park, N.S.W., Australia

Painted Lady Butterfly

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Bournda National Park, N.S.W., Australia

Hawk Moth (about 2 inches (5cm) long)

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Bournda National Park, N.S.W., Australia

Common Brown

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Yellowpinch, N.S.W., Australia

Vertebrates

1. Reptiles

Lace Goanna (or Lace Monitor) (about a metre long - 3 to 4 feet)

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Yellowpinch, N.S.W., Australia

Red-bellied Black Snake (poisonous but not very aggressive)

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Wolumla, N.S.W., Australia

2. Birds

White-faced Heron

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Merimbula, N.S.W., Australia

Swamphen

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Bega, N.S.W., Australia

Australian Pelican

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Merimbula, N.S.W., Australia

Coot

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Bega, N.S.W., Australia

Pied Butcher Bird

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Imbil, Queensland, Australia

Brush Turkey (not really a turkey)

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Brisbane Hinterland, N.S.W., Australia

Bronzewing Pigeon

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Merimbula, N.S.W., Australia

3. Mammals - Monotreme (Egg Laying Mammals)

The only known monotreme mammals in our world are the platypus (Australia only) and the echidna (Australia and New Guinea). Here is a an echidna (or spiny anteater) I saw while on a hike.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Merimbula, N.S.W., Australia

4. Mammals - Marsupial (Pouched Mammals)

Brushtail Possum

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Bournda National Park, N.S.W., Australia

Eastern Grey Kangaroo joey (This joey is now too big for the pouch.)

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Bournda National Park, N.S.W., Australia

4. Mammals - Placental

Bottle-nosed dolphins - They were swimming parallel to a beach

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Bournda National Park, N.S.W., Australia

Dingo - dingoes are our wild dogs. They were thought to have arrived with the first Aboriginal people. This make is named Djingo. He lives at Potoroo Palace. WIld dingoes aren't found in my area. They can't bark like domestic dogs. Like wolves, they can howl.

Schools and students have permission to use this graphic for non-commercial, educational purposes.

Location: Potoroo Palace, N.S.W., Australia

6 thoughts on “Some More Aussie Animals for Alexis & Techie Kids

  1. Alexis

    Dear Mr. Mannell,

    I love science too. It’s one of my favorite subjects. Thanks for those pictures they were really cool. I loved all of them especially the Dingo, Dolphins, Eastern Grey Kangaroo, and the Blue-Bottle Jelly Fish.

    This is my last technology class for the year and now I’m going to art. I’m still going to try and blog, I’ll just blog from home. Blogging has become a part of me now so I don’t think im going to stop anytime soon. Thanks again for the extended comments, and all the pictures of animals. I really appreciated them all 🙂

    Sincerely,
    Alexis
    Techie Kids

    Reply
    1. rossmannell

      Post author

      Dear Alexis,

      Being interested in many things has its advantages. While science is a favourite subject, so is art, craft, music, history, geography, reading and writing. If we keep our minds open, there is so much in our world to catch our interest.

      I hope you enjoy your time in art. Perhaps you might blog about it. 🙂

      @RossMannell

      Reply
  2. Alexis

    Dear Mr. Mannell,

    I like art too, I’m just going to miss computer class because it’s my last year here at my school. The school year is going by so fast, were done with the 3rd quarter this friday. I am a little nervous for high school, but I am also very excited. 🙂

    Sincerely,
    Alexis
    Techie Kids

    Reply
    1. rossmannell

      Post author

      Dear Alexis,

      We all face changes in our lives as we grow. With your positive attitude, I think you will find yourself settling into high school all too soon. I faced the same feelings when I moved from primary (elementary) to high school and then to university (college).

      When I first started teaching, a change for me, I was also nervous and excited. When I look back after all these years, I have never regretted the choice I made to enter teaching. I may be retired from full time teaching now but I have never stopped learning and, through blogging, I continue to share with students. I have many wonderful memories of the many people I have met along the way.

      @RossMannell

      Reply
  3. Alexis

    Dear Mr. Mannell,

    Thanks for the advice it helps. What class did you teach and what grade was it? It must of been fun being a teacher. My sister wants to be one too. She likes that kind of thing, for me I still think I’m going to be a vet. I love animals and being a vet has been a thing I have wanted to do for a while now.

    Sincerely,
    Alexis
    Techie Kids

    Reply
    1. rossmannell

      Post author

      Dear Alexis,

      While learning to be a teacher, I tutored maths up to Year 12 (17 and 18 year old) and reading up to Grade 6. With my qualification, I could have entered high school teaching in science and possibly maths but I preferred the idea of primary (elementary) teaching. In primary, I would be able to teach all subject areas. Being interested in very many things, I think this was the best choice for me.

      I have taken classes from Kindergarten (4 and 5 year old) to Grade 6 but my most common classes were Grade 3 to 5. It can be a great deal of fun working with a class and knowing students have enjoyed being with you. Many of my former students have been in contact over the years. Looking back, I would say it’s possible some of my early students are grandparents now as they would be in their 40s. Now here’s a thought, if I was their teacher, would I be a grandteacher if I taught their children and a great grandteacher if I taught their grandchildren? 🙂

      I think wanting to be a vet is a great choice. It can be hard work to get there but working with animals can be as rewarding as working with children. My science degree had majors in zoology. Part of my studies included animal behaviour, animal physiology and embryology. This meant I had contact with animals of a number of types. My favourite memories are of having a pass into Taronga Zoo in Sydney. I spent two weeks studying the behaviour of their spider monkeys. Looking through my old photos, I found one of a mother and baby spider monkey taken about 40 years back. So I can share the scan of this 35mm slide, I wrote a short extended comment post for you. You will also find a short video clip I learned of just today. It shows an unusual friendship between Kwanza and Honey in Australia’s Darling Downs Zoo in the state of Queensland.

      http://rossmannellcomments.edublogs.org/2013/03/25/south-american-spider-monkey-ateles-fusciceps-for-alexis/

      Do you hope to be a general vet or would you prefer work in a zoo or animal sanctuary?

      @RossMannell

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.